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OLS: MORE Frequently Asked Questions

  1. How much does it cost to participate?
  2. Do libraries need any new equipment?
  3. How do I report a problem?
  4. Won't the large libraries end up supplying material to all the smaller libraries in the state?
  5. What about the smaller libraries? If the large libraries are heavy borrowers, will they be raiding the collections of small libraries?
  6. If my library decides to participate, do we have to lend everything in our collection? Can we say no to some requests?
  7. What about lending software and copyright implications?
  8. Why are we spending money moving books around the state when the same information is available on the Internet?
  9. Can I review requests initiated by my patrons before they are sent to another library?
  10. Can patrons use the Ohio Libraries Share: MORE system to circumvent local circulation policies?
  11. If my library participates in Ohio Libraries Share: MORE, I'm afraid that our materials budget will be cut.
  12. Will patrons use the Ohio Libraries Share: MORE system to request items from other libraries that exist in their home library collection?
  13. Why doesn't OLS: MORE default to searching all available library catalogs in the state?
  14. When would you want to allow patrons to request an item that their library owns from another library?
  15. If my library is interested in joining Ohio Libraries Share: MORE, what's our next step?
  16. What should I ask my vendor about NCIP?
  17. When will my library be able to participate?

1. How much does it cost to participate?
The only out of pocket cost participating libraries incur is the monthly fee for delivery service. The cost of the software program was covered by an LSTA grant from the State Library of Ohio. Library patrons do not pay any fees for this service. [top]


2. Do libraries need any new equipment?
They shouldn't -- libraries can access the Ohio Libraries Share: MORE service from a computer with Internet access and a current web browser. [top]


3. How do I report a problem with Ohio Libraries Share: MORE?
Library staff can contact the State Library of Ohio at (800)686-1532 or olsmore@library.ohio.gov. Another option is to contact the OLS: MORE vendor, OCLC, at (866)939-6446 or open a trouble ticket via the web at: https://servicedesk.oclc.org

  1. Click on the "Use Self Service Desk" link
  2. Username = your OLS: MORE ID without the 'S'
  3. Password = your OLS: MORE ID without the 'S'
  4. Please include your contact name, email and number in the body of the problem. 

Patrons who are having issues with OLS: MORE should contact their library reference or circulation desk for assistance.

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4. Won't the large libraries end up supplying materials to all the smaller libraries in the state?
Resource sharing pattern studies have not shown this assumption to be true; actually, they show large libraries to be net borrowers, which makes sense when you think about the relationship between large patron populations and circulation activity. The borrowing/lending statistics for OhioLINK show that Ohio State University is the top borrowing institution. [top]


5. What about the smaller libraries? If the large libraries are heavy borrowers, will they be raiding the collections of small libraries?
Resource sharing patterns have not shown this assumption to be true, either. With the software used for Ohio Libraries Share: MORE, as with other shared catalogs, we have the capability to manipulate the device that builds the lending string so libraries will share the load equally. We also will monitor lending activity on an on-going basis to provide load balancing among the participating libraries. [top]


6. If my library decides to participate, do we have to lend everything in our collection? Can we say no to some requests?
The OLS: MORE Users Group has established the Principles of Cooperation which prescribe the borrowing/lending behavior of OLS: MORE participants. One of the guiding principles on lending is that if the item circulates, it can be requested and loaned. If an item is unavailable (checked out, on a long reserve list, or needed for an upcoming program), the lending library can say no to the request. And of course, if an item does not circulate to your own patrons (e.g. building use only items), you do not have to loan to OLS: MORE participants. [top]


7. What about lending software and copyright implications?
If your library lends software to its patrons, then it should be able to lend software on a statewide basis. If you have software, but don't lend it (i.e. check it out), then your library will not be expected to loan it to Ohio Libraries Share: MORE patrons.

A related example is the "ebook" (which is both a text file and hardware device). We are in the process of verifying copyright implications with NetLibrary, a major ebook text vendor. The OLS: MORE Users Group has determined that libraries do not need to lend equipment (such as ebook readers) via the statewide system.  [top]


8. Why are we spending money moving books around the state when the same information is available on the Internet?
Research studies on resource sharing show that patrons tend to use virtual catalogs (like Ohio Libraries Share: MORE) to request known items, i.e. they are usually looking for a particular book or video, not information in general, or information on a particular topic. Patrons seeking information on a particular topic will probably be satisfied by an item already in their library collection or in an OPLIN database. They can be directed to an Internet site by a library staff member. Ohio Libraries Share: MORE comes into play when patrons can't find an item they want in their own catalog and choose to search library catalogs across the state. [top]


9. Can I review requests initiated by my patrons before they are sent to another library?
Certainly, but we expect that libraries will dispense with this feature very quickly. During the implementation period, all outgoing requests (initiated by patrons or students at your library) can be held in a file for review and approval by library staff. Once libraries are comfortable with the process, they can then ask us to disable the approval process so requests are released automatically. Participating libraries also have access to reports of items requested so they can use this information for collection development purposes. [top]


10. My library has local circulation policies that govern the types of materials checked out by children, e.g. children under the age of 17 cannot check out an R-rated video without parental consent. Can patrons use the Ohio Libraries Share: MORE system to circumvent local circulation policies?
According to the Principles of Cooperation developed by the Ohio Libraries Share: MORE Policy Committee, requests will be filled in accordance with the policies of the requesting library, which is the "home library" of the patron and the library which will check out the item. If library policies prohibit patrons under the age of 17 to check out an R-rated video without parental consent, they cannot request an R-rated video from another library and check it out from their home library. [top]


11. If my library participates in OLS:MORE, I'm afraid that our materials budget will be cut. Decision makers will feel that we can provide materials through resource sharing instead of building our own collection. How can we justify the need for resource sharing without hurting our own collections?
Everyone understands why resource sharing is necessary, often to the extent of questioning why a library needs a collection when it can borrow from others. However, to make Ohio Libraries Share: MORE work, libraries have to agree to be lenders as well as borrowers. All libraries share the responsibility of developing their collections to meet the needs of local patrons first, and then the needs of remote users.

One of the major benefits of resource sharing is that it allows participating libraries to provide greater resources in more cost-effective ways to local patrons. Libraries will still need to build their collections to serve their communities or support their school curriculum, but with OLS: MORE they will have increased access to materials to improve the service they currently provide. Library collections are a drawing point; they are necessary to bring people into a library and they are necessary to provide a level of service. Resource sharing increases the level of service libraries can offer their patrons and boosts patron satisfaction.


12. Will patrons use the OLS: MORE system to request items from other libraries that exist in their home library collection?
The software used for the Ohio Libraries Share: MORE resource sharing system will hold a patron's request if their local library owns the item. Libraries can choose whether to release the request to the system, or fill the request from their local holdings. [top]


13. Why doesn't OLS: MORE search all catalogs in the state by default?
Ohio Libraries Share: MORE does search all catalogs to fill a request, but patrons choose specific catalogs to search for titles to request. Ohio Libraries Share: MORE uses Z39.50 to conduct a live search of selected catalogs; the more catalogs that it searches, the longer it will take to get results back. There is also a large overlap in library collections, so as more catalogs are searched, more redundant hits are returned. A patron only has to find the title in one catalog.


14. When would you want to allow patron to request an item that their library owns from another library?
An example that quickly comes to mind is when the original item is lost or missing. When a patron places a request on an item owned by her own library, the staff has the choice of deciding whether to release the request to other Ohio Libraries Share: MORE libraries or place the request in the local system. If a patron requests a best seller, for which there is a long waiting list at her own library, the item is likely to have long waiting lists at every library in the state. Releasing the request statewide will result in the request coming back nonsupplied. However, if the requested item is currently in demand at the local library because of an author visit, releasing the request to other Ohio Libraries Share: MORE libraries may result in filling the request more quickly. [top]


15. If my library is interested in joining OLS: MORE, what’s our next step?
Please follow this link and complete the check list in order to sign up for OLS: MORE.
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16. What should I ask my vendor about NCIP?
We recommend asking your vendor:

  • When do you expect to implement NCIP?
  • What NCIP functions do you intend to develop first?
  • Is there a charge for the NCIP module? Is there a price offset for already licensing SIP2?

Here is a more technical explanation of how we use protocols like SIP and NCIP in the Ohio Libraries Share: MORE project. [top]


17. When will my library be able to participate?
We can work with the following Automated Library Systems: Dynix, Follett, Sirsi Dynix Horizon, Innovative Interfaces, Polaris, Sirsi Dynix Unicorn, Spectrum, Spydus and TLC. If you have any of these Automated Library Systems you can sign up now for OLS: MORE. School libraries automated with INFOhio/MultiLIS should contact INFOhio about joining the system. [top]